Aidpage is a
support network.
Ask for help
Offer help
Sign up now
Talking about:
2 posts
363 visits

Blood Diseases and Resources Research

Squirrel started this conversation

This federal aid program is managed by:

National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services

Objectives:

To foster research and research training on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of non-malignant blood diseases, including anemias, sickle cell disease, thalassemia; leukocyte biology, pre-malignant processes such as myelodysplasia and myeloproliferative disorders; hemophilia and other abnormalities of hemostasis and thrombosis; and immune dysfunction. Funding encompasses a broad spectrum of hematologic inquiry, ranging from stem cell biology to medical management of blood diseases and to assuring the adequacy and safety of the nation's blood supply. Programs also support the development of novel cell-based therapies to bring the expertise of transfusion medicine and stem cell technology to the repair and regeneration of human tissues and organs. Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program: To stimulate technological innovation; to increase private sector commercialization of innovations derived from Federal research and development; to increase small business participation in Federal research and development; and to foster and encourage participation of socially and economically disadvantaged small business concerns and women-owned small business concerns in technological innovation. Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program: To stimulate and foster scientific and technological innovation through cooperative research development carried out between small business concerns and research institutions; to foster technology transfer between small business concerns and research institutions; to increase private sector commercialization of innovations derived from Federal research and development; and to foster and encourage participation of socially and economically disadvantaged small business concerns and women-owned small business concerns in technological innovation.

Funding obligations:

(Project Grants) FY 09 $363,994,253; FY 10 est $373,822,098; FY 11 est $385,036,761 - In fiscal year 2009, 857 research grants and National Research Service Awards were made. The estimates of fiscal year 2010 are 782 research grants and 97 National Research Service awards. The estimates for fiscal year 2011 are 806 research grants and 100 National Research Service Awards. In fiscal year 2009, for new and competing renewal awards: 976 grant applications were received, and of these, 195 were awarded; 72 National Research Service Award applications were received, and of these, 31 were awarded. Small Business innovation Research Awards/Small Technology Transfer Research Awards: In fiscal year 2009, 12 Phase I awards, and 8 Phase II awards were made.

Uses and Use Restrictions:

Grants may support salaries, equipment, supplies, travel, and patient hospitalization as required to perform the research effort. Restrictions or limitations are imposed against the use of funds for entertainment, foreign travel, general-purpose equipment, alterations and renovations, and other items not regularly required for the performance of research. National Research Service Awards (NRSAs) are made directly to individuals for research training. Grants may be made to institutions to enable them to make NRSAs to individuals selected by them. Certain service and payback provisions apply to individuals upon termination of the award. SBIR Phase I grants (of approximately 6-months' duration) are to establish the technical merit and feasibility of a proposed research effort that may lead to a commercial product or process. Phase II grants are for the continuation of the research initiated in Phase I and which are likely to result in commercial products or processes. Only Phase I awardees are eligible to apply for Phase II support. STTR Phase I grants (normally of 1-year duration) are to determine the scientific, technical, and commercial merit and feasibility of the proposed cooperative effort that has potential for commercial application. These awards are made to small businesses working in collaboration with academic institutions. Phase II funding is based on results of research initiated in Phase I and scientific and technical merit and commercial potential on Phase II application. While the intent of the SBIR/STTR programs is commercialization (Phase III), no SBIR/STTR funds are allowed for commercialization activities such as patents; market and sales; market research; business development/product development/market plans; legal fees, travel and other costs including labor relating to license agreements and partnerships.

Examples of Funded Projects:

Not Applicable.

Program Accomplishments:

Not Applicable.

Types of Assistance:

PROJECT GRANTS

Range and Average of Financial Assistance:

Grants: $2,000 to $5,132,543; $466,139. SBIR/STTR: Phase I - $100,000; Phase II - up to $750,000.

Length and Time Phasing of Assistance:

The Advisory Council may recommend funding for periods ranging from 1 to 5 years. Funding commitments are made annually. SBIR: Normally, Phase I awards are for 6 months; normally, Phase II awards are for 2 years. STTR: Normally, Phase I awards are for 1 year; normally, Phase II awards are for 2 years. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: Award length may vary depending on the recommendation of the scientific review group, the national advisory council, successful annual performance, and availability of funds. See the following for information on how assistance is awarded/released: A formal notification in the form of a Notice of Award (NoA) will be provided to the applicant organization.

Applicant Eligibility:

Any nonprofit organization engaged in biomedical research and institutions (or companies) organized for profit may apply for grants, with the exception of NRSAs. An individual may apply for a NRSA or, in some cases, may qualify for a research grant if adequate facilities in which to perform the research are available. SBIR grants can be awarded only to domestic small businesses (entities that are independently owned and operated for profit, or owned by another small business that itself is independently owned and operated for profit, are not dominant in the field in which research is proposed, and have no more than 500 employees including affiliates). Primary employment (more than one-half time) of the principal investigator must be with the small business at the time of award and during the conduct of the proposed project. In both Phase I and Phase II, the research must be performed in the U.S. and its possessions. To be eligible for funding, a grant application must be approved for scientific merit and program relevance by a scientific review group and a national advisory council. SBIR projects must be performed at least 67% by the applicant small business in Phase I and at least 50% of the project in Phase II. STTR grants can be awarded only to domestic small business concerns (entities that are independently owned and operated for profit, are not dominant in the field in which research is proposed and have no more that 500 employees which 'partner' with a research institution in cooperative research and development. At least 40 percent of the project is to be performed by the small business concern and at least 30 percent by the research institution. In both Phase I and Phase II, the research must be performed in the U.S. and its possessions. To be eligible for funding, a grant application must be approved for scientific merit and program relevance by a scientific review group and a national advisory council.

Beneficiary Eligibility:

Any nonprofit or for-profit organization, company or institution engaged in biomedical research. Only domestic for-profit small business firms may apply for SBIR and STTR programs.

Award Procedure:

All accepted applications are evaluated by an appropriate initial review group (study section). All grant applications receive a final secondary review by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Advisory Council. Fellowship applications have a secondary review by the staff of the Institute. Staff informs applicants of the results of the review. If support is contemplated, staff initiates preparations of awards for grants. All accepted SBIR/STTR applications are evaluated for scientific and technical merit by an appropriate scientific peer review panel and by a national advisory council or board. All applications receiving a priority score compete for available SBIR/STTR set-aside funds on the basis of scientific and technical merit and commercial potential of the proposed research, program relevance, and program balance among the areas of research. Eligibilility criteria must be verified prior to the competing award as stated in the SBIR/STTR Funding Opportunity Announcement and annual OMNIBUS SOLICITIATION.

Contact Info for Headquarters Office:

Roy L. White, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Rm 7176, MSC7924, Bethesda, Maryland 20817 Email: whiter@nhlbi.nih.gov Phone: (301) 435-0310.

Website Address:

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov .

Click here to add your comment...
spen
kool
Talk to spen